Trampolines aren’t just for kids who need exercise. These backyard toys offer a wonderful, fun way for folks of all ages to burn calories, let loose and get in shape. Benefits of working out this way may include toning muscles, strengthening your body and letting out some fully belly laughs. Consider this inspiration and a prier on how to get started trampolining for health.

Getting Started with Trampoline

Look for a full sized trampoline to enjoy the most health benefits. So-called rebounder or mini trampolines offer fewer health benefits than the real deal, although their size may be more convenient. Because you cannot bounce in the same way on the mini version, you’ll get less of a workout.

A gentle “health bounce” or warm-up bounce serves as a good warm-up for trampoline enthusiasts of any level, and can help newbies get used to moving on a trampoline. Begin at the middle of the trampoline with your feet hip width apart. Gently rock back and forth on your feet, but do not jump. The light bouncing motion will get lymphatic fluid circulating and warm up your body for that higher intensity workout.

Once you’re warmed up, stretch muscles to prevent injury. Stretching while on a trampoline sounds counter-intuitive but there are a couple ways to make it work. Stretch legs and groin while sitting on the trampoline. Or get off the trampoline and use it as a prop for quad and glute stretches. Get some arm action by incorporating arm and shoulder stretches into your health bounce trampoline bounce.

Beginner Moves

trampolineStart with a basic trampoline bounce, a gentle sort of up and down motion that mimics the motion you do when you get onto a trampoline. To start, try to keep your bounces to around the same height even though you may be tempted to see how high you can go. This helps you practice good trampoline form.

Move onto a bounce and kick once you’ve mastered your basic bounce. For this move, kick one leg up so it becomes parallel to the ground — or as close to parallel as you can get it — during a bounce. Bring the leg back down so you land on both feet. Alternate legs for kicking, doing a series of reps. This move will help you build leg muscle. For a variation of the bounce and kick, try a high knee kick by raising your knee as high as you can toward your torso. At the same time, bring the opposite elbow to meet the knee. Alternate knees for a full body workout that strengthens your legs and engages your core muscles.

Intermediate Moves

Once you’ve worked through the basic moves, work your way up to flips. These may seem scary at first so take it slow. Flips start from tuck jumps, or high jumps where you tuck your knees to your chest. Try getting your body used to the motion by getting on your hands and knees in the trampoline center. Practice tuck jumps with your hands above your head and add a pelvic thrust that sends your backside back (for a somersault) or forward (for a back flip). Jump high, then give the full roll a go. Putting your momentum into the jump gives you plenty of room to rotate.

Trampoline workouts improve coordination, balance and flexibility. By learning how to move your body and fall safely, you’ll also stay safer in other sports, from skiing to cycling. Most important of all, a trampoline offers stress release and a fun workout you can do from home!

http://feelgoodtime.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/trampoline-e1446769860961.jpghttp://feelgoodtime.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/trampoline-275x135.jpgDanielle M.Body Healthexercise,feelgoodtime-net,Fitness,trampolines,weight lossTrampolines aren't just for kids who need exercise. These backyard toys offer a wonderful, fun way for folks of all ages to burn calories, let loose and get in shape. Benefits of working out this way may include toning muscles, strengthening your body and letting out some fully belly laughs....Your Daily Medicine And Healthy Pregnancy